C-47 Over Normandy on D-Day

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Here is the completed picture of two C-47s over Normandy on D-Day. I tried to capture the stormy night and the flak fire aimed at them. It had to have been a scary night. Not everything went by the plan that not but it was still the successful beginning of the defeat of Hitler in Europe. We should always be grateful to the brave men of that night – included our own Ray Pegram from Spindale and my church, Spencer Baptist. Thank you, Ray… and thank you brave men.

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Dueling Banjos – the Final

JenkinsBanjosThis is the final of the Dueling Banjos. Actually, they should be called The Jenkins Banjos. I apologize for taking so long and not posting. My back problems just took it’s toll on my efforts. It took 66.5 hours but almost six months to finish this drawing. Hope you like it.

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Hiatus

I suppose you’ve noticed that I’ve not posted in a while. I am currently experienceing back pain which prevents me from being able to sit and draw with comfort. I am working on the problem and will be back as soon as possible. I do miss it, so hopefully it will be soon.

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Dueling Banjos #3

banjo3_1banjo3_2banjo3_3The completion of the first banjo – a Gibson Mastertone RB-6 played by Hoke Jenkins and owned by Phillip Jenkins of Rutherfordton, NC. Next will be the RB-4 played by Snuffy Jenkins of Rutherford County, NC

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!!! BIG ANNOUNCEMENT !!!

TimkenFinal_ARemember this guy? Where I work, The Timken Company, we have an intranet where company employees can look at company news and stuff. Every Friday, the company features an employee who has accomplished something of note. Keep in mind, Timken is a world-wide company with some 17,000 employees, so a lot of people see these features. Back in September, my drawing of the train was featured and drew a good amount of interest because of its ties to Timken from years ago.

A couple of weeks ago, I received an email from the General Manager of Purchasing at our company headquarters. In appreciation of some help received from a supplier, he wanted to give the owner a gift of appreciation. It turns out the owner is a big rail enthusieist. He went to the marketing deparment in search of a Timken item that a someone interested in trains would be interested it, but they didn’t have anything. Then someone in Marketing remembered my drawing. He was interested in knowing if I had any prints of my train. I told him that I didn’t have any, but was hoping to have some when I was able to afford it and knew more about how to have it done and all those kind of details.

He wrote me back and told me that he was sure our rail sales people would like to have prints to give to customers as well as his suppliers (we are a ball bearing and steel company). His father has just retired from a printing company who does art reproduction work. They have gotten together to call in some favors and worked up a deal to have prints made of my train. While they are making prints for Timken, they will also make some for me for my own personal use. This is at NO cost for me and they are just waiting for me to send them my original and for me to tell them how many I want! I will now be able to sell these for “seed” money to have prints made of other things. Basically, my own company is setting me up in the art business!

Needless to say, I am estatic! I’ll have more details later on how much a print will sell for and stuff. If you’d like to buy one, keep it in mind and I’ll post more information. This is a Godsend, people. I’ve been praying for this and God has smiled on me. This could only happen because of Him. Y’all pray for me!

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Dueling Banjos

You remember the Beverly Hillbillies? Of course you do. Remember the song? Of course you do. If you remember the song, you remember the sound of a banjo. The banjo was played by the famous Earl Scruggs. Earl grew up in Shelby, NC before he bacame a household name. He was influnenced in his three-finger style from a gentleman named Snuffy Jenkins from Forest City, NC which is where I live. Every year, Forest City has a Bluegrass festival in his name. Although Snuffy wasn’t the national household name like Earl Scruggs, he was very well know in the Bluegrass world in the 1930’s, as was Hoke Jenkins, Snuffy’s brother. Hoke’s banjo now belongs to his great-nephew Phillip Jenkins, who is a good friend of mine at work and provided the photos for the source of this drawing. This drawing will be of the banjos belonging to Hoke and Snuffy, Hoke’s will be drawn first. Follow along as I draw these two historic and extremely valuable banjos.
Banjo1banjo2banjo3banjo4

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